The Washington Post

Monday, November 3, 2014 - 07:15
In 1984, a year after coming to power at the head of a military coup, Thomas Sankara addressed the U.N. General Assembly. Claiming the mantle for the dispossessed, for women, for youths, for the poor, Sankara — then all of 34 years old and just three years away from his tragic killing — told the assemblage of international elites: “I protest on behalf of all those who vainly seek a forum in this world where they can make their voice heard and have it genuinely taken into consideration.”
Monday, November 3, 2014 - 07:09
The site of the U.S. military’s future Ebola treatment center is now an overgrown grassland next to an abandoned airstrip on the Guinean border.
Monday, November 3, 2014 - 06:56
Canadian warplanes involved in the U.S.-led bombing campaign against militants in Iraq have launched their first airstrikes since deploying to the region.
Friday, October 31, 2014 - 06:26
More than 1,000 foreign fighters are streaming into Syria each month, a rate that has so far been unchanged by airstrikes against the Islamic State and efforts by other countries to stem the flow of departures, according to U.S. intelligence and counterterrorism officials.
Friday, October 31, 2014 - 06:18
Recent reports of Egyptian military aircraft bombing Islamist militant positions in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi have highlighted once more how the Mediterranean state has become a contested site of regional proxy wars. The projection of Middle Eastern rivalries onto Libya’s fractured landscape has a long pedigree, dating back to the 2011 revolution and perhaps even further, when Moammar Gaddafi’s propaganda apparatus portrayed the country as a plaything at the mercy of predatory imperialists. During the uprising, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar jostled for influence, with their respective special forces supporting disparate revolutionary factions with intelligence, training and arms. Initially, the choice of actors had less to do with ideological affinity and more with expediency, history and geography. Libyan expatriates residing in each country shaped the channeling of funds and weapons.
Friday, October 31, 2014 - 06:14
It is an unusually mild day in Cairo for late September, but the young man perspires throughout our interview. He recounts the nightmares that continue months after he was released from prison, where he was detained for more than a month on unfounded accusations of illegally participating in a demonstration. Later that afternoon, arriving at the offices of a human rights organization, I trade glances with a thuggish man planted at a desk near the door to look over everyone who comes and goes. Inside, staff members describe in haunting terms the pressures they feel from heightened government surveillance and threats. That evening at a diplomatic dinner, a human rights activist renowned for his integrity tells me about an upcoming trip outside the country. Then he leans close and whispers, “I’m not coming back. It’s been made clear to me I have no choice.”
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 08:22
China has pledged two billion yuan ($327 million) in aid to Afghanistan, which is seeking new sources of foreign help amid a drawdown of U.S. troops and increasing worries about regional instability.
Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 07:45
Earlier this month the Pentagon entered a new phase of its air campaign in Iraq against the Islamic State when it announced that AH-64 Apache helicopters would assist beleaguered Iraqi and Kurdish ground forces. Almost simultaneously on Twitter, the Islamic State released a how-to guide on how to shoot down the heavily armed aircraft with a man portable air defense system or MANPADS.
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 06:27
Afghanistan’s Pol-i-Charkhi Prison has had a reputation for brutality virtually since it was first constructed in 1973. The Soviets are believed to have tortured Afghan detainees there, and it was the site of a wild riot in 2006 in which hundreds of prisoners, including al-Qaeda fighters, seized part of the facility.
Monday, October 27, 2014 - 07:54
Recent reports of Egyptian military aircraft bombing Islamist militant positions in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi have highlighted once more how the Mediterranean state has become a contested site of regional proxy wars. The projection of Middle Eastern rivalries onto Libya’s fractured landscape has a long pedigree, dating back to the 2011 revolution and perhaps even further, when Moammar Gaddafi’s propaganda apparatus portrayed the country as a plaything at the mercy of predatory imperialists. During the uprising, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar jostled for influence, with their respective special forces supporting disparate revolutionary factions with intelligence, training and arms. Initially, the choice of actors had less to do with ideological affinity and more with expediency, history and geography. Libyan expatriates residing in each country shaped the channeling of funds and weapons.

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